Category: Essays

  • Popular Fiction: Literature or Commodity

    “… Para literature occupies the space outside the literary enclosure, as a forbidden, taboo and perhaps degraded product against which the ‘self’ of literature proper is forged.” – Mark Angenot “… a discipline which refuses to take into account ninety percent or more of what constitutes its domain seems to me not only to have…

  • Waiting for a Visa by B. R. Ambedkar

    Foreigners of course know of the existence of untouchability. But not being next door to it, so to say, they are unable to realise how oppressive it is in its actuality. It is difficult for them to understand how it is possible for a few untouchables to live on the edge of a village consisting…

  • A New Year’s Gift sent to the Parliament and Army by Gerrard Winstanley

    Gentlemen of the Parliament and Armie; you and the Common people have assisted each other, to cast out the Head of oppression which was Kingly power, seated in one mans hand, and that work is now done, and till that work was done you called upon the people to assist you to deliver this distressed…

  • Of Sense by Thomas Hobbes

    Concerning the thoughts of man, I will consider them first singly, and afterwards in train or dependence upon one another. Singly, they are every one a representation or appearance of some quality, or other accident of a body without us, which is commonly called an object. Which object worketh on the eyes, ears, and other…

  • Of the Natural Condition of Mankind, As Concerning Their Felicity, and Misery by Thomas Hobbes

    Nature hath made men so equal in the faculties of body and mind as that, though there be found one man sometimes manifestly stronger in body or of quicker mind than another, yet when all is reckoned together the difference between man and man is not so considerable as that one man can thereupon claim…

  • Of Deformity by Francis Bacon

    Deformed persons are commonly even with nature; for as nature hath done ill by them, so do they by nature; being for the most part (as the Scripture saith) void of natural affection; and so they have their revenge of nature. Certainly there is a consent, between the body and the mind; and where nature…

  • On Poetry in General by William Hazlitt

    The best general notion which I can give of poetry is, that it is the natural impression of any object or event, by its vividness exciting an involuntary movement of imagination and passion, and producing, by sympathy, a certain modulation of the voice, or sounds, expressing it. In treating of poetry, I shall speak first…

  • Goethe by Thomas Carlyle

    Of a nature so rare and complex as Goethe’s it is difficult to form a true comprehension; difficult even to express what comprehension one has formed. In Goethe’s mind, the first aspect that strikes us is its calmness, then its beauty; a deeper inspection reveals to us its vastness and unmeasured strength. This man rules,…

  • A Defence of Poetry by Percy Bysshe Shelley

    According to one mode of regarding those two classes of mental action, which are called reason and imagination, the former may be considered as mind contemplating the relations borne by one thought to another, however produced; and the latter, as mind acting upon those thoughts so as to colour them with its own light, and…

  • On Poetic Genius and Poetic Diction by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

    During the first year that Mr. Wordsworth and I were neighbours, our conversation turned frequently on the two cardinal points of poetry, the power of exciting the sympathy of the reader by a faithful adherence to the truth of nature, and the power of giving the interest of novelty by the modifying colours of imagination.…

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