Fog – Important Questions

Carl Sandburg compares the fog to a cat. The fog approaches noiselessly and stealthily, just like a cat. Just as the cat sits on its haunches, the fog too seems to be sitting quietly, watching the harbour and the city and then quietly moves onwards.

Important Question and Answers

Q. Read the lines given below and answer the questions that follow:

The fog comes
on little cat feet
It sits looking
over harbour and city
on silent haunches
and then moves on.

  1. Who is ‘It’ in the above lines?
    1. cut
    2. fog
    3. city
    4. harbour
  2. How does fog comes on?
    1. little dog feet
    2. little rat feet
    3. little birds feet
    4. little cat feet
  3. Where does the fog sit on?
    1. harbour and city
    2. top of the mountains
    3. top of the tall trees
    4. top of buildings
  4. Name the poem.
    1. Daffodils
    2. The snow
    3. The cat
    4. Fog
  5. The fog is compared to what?
    1. mouse
    2. cat
    3. dog
    4. ant
  6. The figure of speech used in these lines is?
    1. personification
    2. analogy
    3. personification/analogy
    4. none of them
  7. How does the cat sits?
    1. on its paws
    2. on its back
    3. on its haunches
    4. on its stomach
  8. Name the poet.
    1. Robert Frost
    2. Robin Klein
    3. John Berryman
    4. Carl Sandburg

Answers

  1. fog
  2. little cat feet
  3. harbour and city
  4. Fog
  5. cat
  6. personification/analogy
  7. on its haunches
  8. Carl Sandburg

Q. What does Sandburg think the fog is like? OR What does the poet compare the fog to?

Ans. Carl Sandburg compares the fog to a cat. The metaphorical expression ‘on little cat feet’ implies that the fog approaches noiselessly and stealthily, just like a cat.

Q. According to the poet, in what respect is the fog similar to a cat? Do you think the comparison made is appropriate?

Ans. The poet Carl Sandburg observes the analogy between the fog and the behaviour of a cat. The approach of the fog is silent and noiseless, stealthily advancing on its silent, ‘paws’. From a distance, it seems like a cat moving on its haunches cautiously, analysing its surroundings before being taken into notice.

Q. What is the rhyme scheme in the poem?

Ans. The poem does not have a rhyme scheme. This style of poetry is called free verse.

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